The Bearded Lizards Of Southern Mexico


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Beaded Lizard

The Bearded Lizards Of Southern Mexico

If you are a lizard lover then you would have certainly heard of the Beaded lizard. It is one of the three common lizard species in the United States. The other two species are the Eastern Blue Lizards and the Western Redback Lizards. Beaded lizards belong to the family Clibanarius or Necklaces weitzmanni, which is also known as Necklaces or Snake Weitzmanni. These lizards were first brought to this country from the ancient country of Mexico about fifty years ago.

Mexican beaded lizards closely resemble the Gila reptiles. They are usually dark brown or black with yellow or orange spots on their tail. The lizard’s skin is made up of stiff, horny beaded scales known as osteodermata that contain pieces of keratin, which give the lizards their hard, leathery outer shell. These hard scales also provide them with a very efficient tail protection.

Believed to be an opportunistic predator, the Mexican beaded lizard can take down a wide variety of prey including small reptiles, birds, mammals, insects, worms and even more animals. However, they can only succeed in doing so if they are well-clad with their highly specialized defensive armor, especially the head. It is situated in the upper part of its body between its eye and tail and serves as a shield for the lizard when it is attacked. It has a heavy, double-layered belly armor and powerful forearms.

It is primarily nocturnal and lives mostly in thick vegetation close to water. There is not clear evidence regarding the exact diet of this secretive lizard, but it is assumed that they eat fish and aquatic invertebrates, along with other vertebrates such as birds and lizards. Because they have powerful jaws capable of breaking through tougher armor, they often end up killing their prey through their venom glands. The most deadly venom produced by a Beaded lizard has a neurotoxic effect and has been compared to that of a cobra snake’s poisonous saliva.

The last known species of the Mexican Bearded lizard is the long-tailed Amazon. Also known as the “flying rat snakes” these specimens have an impressive array of colors, including bright orange and black stripes along their back, mantle-line, and tail. They can grow up to 15 inches long and feed on smaller animals, mainly lizards, along with some birds. The last recorded alive was a king snake, which roamed the deserts of the southwestern United States. The largest known specimen was over half a foot long.

All four of the subspecies are believed to be unique, with only one appearing in captivity. Only one of the subspecies, the horrid subspecies, is found in the wild and all of the others are thought to be either undemanding or otherwise harmless. There is also a chance that the fifth species may have been accidentally introduced into the mix but that so far it has not been detected or recorded. These lizards can be found in many areas throughout the Mexican states of Chiapas, Oaxaca, and Veracruz, although their natural habitat is thought to be confined to the mountainous regions of northern Mexico. Their natural habitats consist of thick jungles of oak, cacti, jute, and brush.

Noted specimens include the well known Mexican Wolfsnake, the red-tailed boobie, the slender case boobie, and the long-tailed boobie. It is thought that these lizards were originally brought to the New World by Christopher Columbus who later brought a number of them back to Mexico. All the aforementioned species belong to the Gila Monster Amphibian Order and they are considered to be endemic to Mexico. Some specimens are still kept by conservation authorities as part of the national inventory.

One of the most distinguishing features of the Bearded Lizard is its highly distinctive set of prominent, backward-pointing, pterygoid teeth. This feature, along with a short, rostrum, makes the lizard different from most other reptiles and it is the result of an ancestral relationship with iguanodon. It is also the only known species in the genus Necrotaurus to have four subspecies with distinctly modified jaws and teeth. The most probable explanation for the presence of these four subspecies-a split into two in relation to their appearance-is that this extinct group of reptiles had evolved into distinct species by means of gene flow.

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